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Hoodies + Sweatshirts for Women | Don Jamaine Clothung

 

 Hoodies + Sweatshirts for Women | Don Jamaine Clothung






 Who doesn’t love a great sweatshirt? If you’ve ever wished you could live in cozy hoodies every day of the week, you’re in luck, because the polished-looking sweatshirts on this list are about to make that dream a reality. Of course, some of the best don Jamaine sweatshirts are more versatile than others; overall, the best option for you depends on the look you’re going for. 



 That said, if you’re looking for sweatshirts with a more polished look, a good place to start is by considering fabric and silhouette. Dressy sweatshirts can vary in terms of style, but generally speaking, sweatshirts made of high-quality materials (like cotton and wool) tend to look more elevated, and silhouettes that mimic a more traditional sweater or tunic often look dressier than sportier designs.







 1. A Polished-Looking Hoodie Made Of Warm, Light Wool

 


 https://www.donjamain.     
 Available sizes: XL- -2X

 Because it's knit of a luxuriously soft wool blend, this pullover hoodie looks way more sophisticated than a typical sweatshirt.









2. A Cowl Neck Sweatshirt That Could Pass For A Nice Sweater

 

                                                                        

                                               Available sizes: XS-XXL 

An elegant cowl neck gives this pretty pullover sweatshirt a refined, dressy look, but because it's technically activewear, it's designed to be super comfortable and easy to move in. The fit is relaxed, but not boxy, with long sleeves, subtly dropped shoulders, and a split hemline that falls just at the hip.















3.The Best Basic Dressy Sweatshirt






Available sizes: XS-XXL


 If you're looking for a basic, versatile sweatshirt that's sophisticated enough to dress up, this simple pullover is an excellent option.









4. This Cozy, Quilted, Preppy-Chic Pullover

 



 Not only does this Sweatshirt look timeless and elegant, but it's also exceptionally warm and cozy, even for a sweatshirt. Designed for outdoor wear, it's made with two layers of 100% cotton jersey and insulated with a lightweight polyester fill.
 















According to British dictionaries, "sweater" is used in British English in the same sense as in American English but "jumper" is commonly used instead (though some say that "sweater" is used for heavier ones worn for warmth).[2][3][1] Oxforddictionaries.com states that in British usage sweaters are always pulled over the head and jumpers are not necessarily,[4][5][6] whereas most or all other British dictionaries disagree and say that sweaters are not necessarily pullovers or even say that jumpers are always pullovers, i.e. never open in front.[7][8]
So according to most British dictionaries, British usage agrees with what American dictionaries describe as American English usage, according to which a sweater is either a pullover or a cardigan (which opens at the front). In other words, almost all British dictionaries include cardigans as a type of sweater but at least one includes cardigans as a type of jumper (i.e. most British dictionaries consider "sweater" – and at least one considers "jumper" – to be a hypernym for both pullovers and cardigans).






The term "sweater" is a catch-all for a variety of knit garments. Although the term often refers to a pullover, it can also refer to a cardigan, a garment that opens and fastens down the front. Within either group, there is a great variety of design. Various necklines are found, although the V-neck, turtleneck and the crew neck are the most popular. The hemline is typically at hip height or slightly longer, just overlapping the waist of one's pants or skirt, but can vary significantly. It can range from just below the bust in women's garments to mid-thigh in either sex, or even longer in a knitted variation of the poncho shirtdress. The sleeve length is also variable, ranging from full-length or three-quarters to short-sleeved, cap sleeves or sleeveless. The front seam or opening of a cardigan allows for further different styles, such as a surplice or a bolero jacket. All hems may have various types of borders, such as picots, ribbing and frills.
Knitted fabrics are generally somewhat elastic and have a softer hand (feel or drape) than woven fabric, sweaters that are more tightly fitted or have a soft drape may conform well to the body without requiring tailoring necessary in a woven garment such as darts, flares and gores. Even when such shaping is used, it can be knit into the fabric itself, without requiring seams.







A sweater with an open front fastened by buttons or a zipper is generally called a cardigan, but the nomenclature for other styles in different dialects can be quite confusing. In British English, a sweater may also be called a pullover, jumper or jersey. In the United States however, "jumper" refers to a style of women's sleeveless dress, worn over a blouse or shirt, and "jersey" refers to a knit shirt, especially if part of an athletic uniform. If sleeveless, such a garment may be called a "slipover" or "tank top" in British English, while "tank top" in US English refers to a sleeveless shirt or undershirt. In the U.S. a sleeveless sweater may also be called a sweater vest, especially if it has a V-neck and somewhat formal appearance resembling a formal vest, a garment known as a waistcoat in the UK In British English, "vest" refers to an undershirt. In South African English, a knitted sweater is always called a jersey, while sweater, when used, refers to a sweatshirt. In the sport of ice hockey, the top of a hockey player's uniform had traditionally been a sweater; and even though modern hockey uniform tops are more commonly a jersey they are typically referred to as a "hockey sweater," regardless of the style, but frequently, in the U.S. it is called a hockey "jersey". 


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